Scams

Debit card fraud

There’s this friend of mine who runs a grocery store, which has online payments. Apparently, one transaction (paid online) was refunded and marked as unauthorized/fraudulent by the bank. The card used by the “buyer” was from a different country, and the cardowner probably disputed it with his bank which is why the transaction was refunded.

Now my question is, since my friend has a record of who made the transaction and where it was delivered, if he pursues to file a case against the apparent fraudster, what kind of evidence does he need? How can he prove that the “buyer” committed a fraudulent transaction?


The content was posted by hellokittypurry on 2021-02-07 05:23:21 via reddit

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3 Comments

  1. Your friend can report this to the police, but they are not likely to do anything (they will tell you that this is a civil matter, which means that they will not investigate it as a criminal matter). The police do not advise people on how to pursue civil lawsuits.

    It doesn’t matter that the recipient of the merchandise (groceries) paid with a debit card, or what bank issued the card, or who the card was issued to, or why the charge to the card was reversed.

    If your friend wants to sue someone to try and recover their loss, then the person that they want to sue is the person that they delivered the merchandise to. All your friend has to do is prove is that they provided merchandise to a particular person (the defendant) who accepted it and who agreed to pay for it, but then failed to pay for it.

    Your friend would run into trouble if “John” ordered something to be delivered, and it was delivered to “Joe” who signed for it at “123 Elm Street”, but neither Jane nor Joe live there. See the problem?

  2. You would need to prove that the *cardholder*, (potentially not the buyer), purchased the product. This usually means providing footage of the cardholder presenting their card, or showing that a product was shipped to the cardholder’s address.

    Buyers win 80% of all chargebacks. If you lose, you can sue for the amount due.

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